Our School Plan to Support Student Learning (2020-21)

Our Journey 

Mouse Mountain Elementary School is situated in the town of Fraser Lake. We acknowledge that Mouse Mountain School is located on the traditional lands of the Stellat'en and the Nadleh Whut'en First Nations where we are grateful to learn, work and play. We are a primary (K-3) school serving a diverse school population of 119 learners.

 

Teamwork is the backbone of the successes of our school. Our staff has a history of professional collaboration that fosters school-wide approaches to learning across the curriculum. We are passionate and committed to the growth of all learners. We know that to achieve success for each learner, we must first build relationships and understanding with each student. Our school shares in the School District 91 mission to achieve educational excellence in an environment that honours diversity, through engaging, personalized and passionate learning.

 

Mouse Mountain School has a strong focus in the areas of social-emotional learning, literacy, and numeracy. 

Responding with Care & Creativity in a Pandemic Year

quoteThe Covid-19 pandemic has presented challenges and impacts for both our school and the community which it serves. Spring of 2020 saw students miss significant in-class instructional time due to the temporary closure of schools and shift to at-home learning during stages 4 and 3 of BC’s Restart Plan. The current 2020-21 school year has operated under stage 2 of this plan with full in-class instruction at Mouse Mountain School. Students and staff are part of learning groups (or cohorts) consisting of 2 classes each. Our school community continues to diligently follow the Province’s K-12 COVID-19 guidelines, and our Mouse Mountain staff continue to remain creative and student-focussed in our planning. We have adapted in a variety of ways:

    • Virtual recorded special events and assemblies
    • Increased focus on social-emotional wellness
    • Interventions to address learning loss
    • Food program offering breakfast, snack and lunch
    • Exploration of structures to allow for staff collaboration

Our Goals - Creating Student Success at Mouse Mountain

pictureMouse Mountain School is committed to build 21st century core competencies through school-wide and classroom-based skill development.  We continue to build an environment for learners that provides supports, choices, positive relationships, and safety. 
 
Mouse Mountain staff communicate regularly and work to build strong connections with members of our school community including education coordinators from Stellat’en and Nadleh Whut’en First Nations, community agencies, and our parent advisory council. We value these important relationships and the positive impacts for our learners that result from the work of these groups.
 
We recognize that social-emotional wellbeing underpins all learning. We also recognize that COVID-19 is on the minds of learners and in some cases may contribute to feelings of stress or uncertainty.
SEL goal
  • Soft Starts: The use of “soft starts” where students begin their day with a caring adult and often a snack.Beano swing
  • Self-Regulation Room: The self-regulation room includes a beano swing, weighted balls, exercise bike, pull-up bar, rowing machine, quiet spot and more. Students identify how they feel before and after the use of the room with the support of visuals and the support of the supervising adult.
  • Self-Regulation Skills: Self-regulation skills are taught school-wide through WITS (Walk Away, Ignore, Talk it out, Seek Help), Zones of Regulation, Second Step and EASE. We are exploring the Brain First program in one grade 3 class this year. Additionally, we are continuing with the SNAP program (Stop Now And Plan). All grade 2/3 teachers have received SNAP training and are implementing SNAP in classrooms starting in January 2021.
  • SEL During Library Time: The focus of library time is social emotional learning and wellness. All classes have library time each week with Ms. Sandback where a new topic is introduced through story.Sensory Pathway
  • Sensory Pathway: This pathway, planned with occupational therapist Sandy Haskett, is set up in the hallway. This year, we have used the pathway less frequently in an attempt to reduce hallway traffic. We are exploring ways to safely increase use of the pathway with staff supervision.
  • In addition to the strategies and interventions listed here, district counselling support is available to students. We also use planned breaks, small group work, and most importantly, caring relationships with adults.
  • We will measure the impact of these strategies and interventions through observation, daily check-ins, and surveys.
  • Assessment of the effectiveness of SNAP strategies will include student self-assessments and SNAP assessments completed by teachers before and after the implementation of the 13-week SNAP program in grade 2/3 classrooms.
Literacy Goals
  • Increase the use of literacy materials which include Indigenous peoples and culture.
  • Joyful Literacy tools and interventions (circle charts: a tracking tool for foundational literacy skills)
  • Shared Read Aloud
  • Kindergarten literacy centers
  • Early intervention with a focus on phonological awareness
  • Student support within the classroom by Learning Support Workers
  • Blitz work several times each week to focus on small sets of literacy skills (Learning Support Worker, Aboriginal Education worker, and Learning Support Teacher run groups). Blitzing has been a greater challenge this year due to the requirement of cohorts
  • Daily morning message read by grade 3 students
  • Exploration of Janet Mort writing resources and 6 Traits of Writing resources
  • 3 classes participating in Storyboard Writing sessions with district literacy resource teacher Michelle Miller Gauthier

  • Kindergarten literacy skills are measured using classroom assessment practices, Circle Charts, and the Early Years Evaluation Direct Assessment (EYE-DA) performed in September and June.
  • PM Benchmark Reading assessment data is used in the assessment of grade 1 – 3 students three times each year (at the end of a term).
  • Assessment of written ideas for grade 3 learners is measured in part using the Spring RAD (district assessment). We are also exploring common tools to assess written ideas including Janet Mort assessment tools, 6 traits of writing and BC curricular assessment resources.
Numeracy goal
  • Revisit essential learning outcomes to confirm common goals and language across grades. Revisiting of curricular content was important this year due to the interruption of instruction the previous year.
  • Daily calendar routines.
  • Mathletics integrated into schedules for grades 1-3.
  • Use of SNAP math tool to improve number sense strategies.
  • Use of Tara West Math resources and/or MathUp resources to support instruction.
  • Use of math manipulatives to support visual representations and use of Rekenrek tool to provide visual models for calculations.
  • Assess often and intervene when needed using RTI model.
  • Student support within the classroom by Learning Support Workers.
  • Use of the SNAP Math tool as both a formative and summative assessment tool for grades 1-3.
  • Assessment of grade 3 students will include data from the District Numeracy Assessment (DNA) performed in Fall and Spring.
  • Assessment for all students includes report card data focusing on number sense.        

 

Indigenous Education Goal
  • Language and culture learning time in every class taught by our Aboriginal Education staff.
  • Increased Carrier language signage in the school.
  • Continuation of community connections. This year, we have not been able to participate in community teas but were able to host a virtual Orange Shirt Day event.
  • Stream of Dreams planned for April 2021 to teach students about land stewardship and protecting our local watershed.
  • School wide button blanket activity lead by Aboriginal Education staff.
  • Series of virtual guest presentations with Indigenous artists and authors.
  • Planning for Video Stories with Elders Project for the 2021-22 school year.

We will look at student engagement in cultural learning opportunities, parent and student survey data in our analysis of our progress and effectiveness.

Data Supporting Mouse Mountain Goals

Spring 2021

Our Spring reading data shows that almost all students in grades 1-3 have made gains, many of them significant gains, in reading this year. We believe that the continuity of instruction and supportive interventions have contributed to these gains. In grade 1, 80% of students are meeting or exceeding expectations in reading. For grades 2 and 3, when we remove tier 3 learner data for students with significant learning/behaviour challenges, we see 35% (grade 2) and 85% (grade 3) of students are meeting or exceeding expectations in reading.

 

Spring 2021 (End of Term 2) PM Benchmark Data

 

No Data

Not Yet Meeting

Meeting

Exceeding

Total Number of Students

% of students who made gains in reading

Gr 1

8%

12.5%

67%

12.5%

24

95%

Gr 2

7%

64%

4%

25%

28

96%

Gr 3

3%

24%

42%

31%

29

96%

 

*Grade 2: when tier 3 learners are removed, 35% of students are meeting or exceeding.

*Grade 3: when tier 3 learners are removed, 85% of students are meeting or exceeding.

 

Fall 2020:

The interruption of in-class instruction in the Spring of 2020 had an impact on learning for many students. Our Fall 2020 data for reading (PM Benchmarks) reflects that most grade 2 and 3 students either maintained or regressed in their reading level compared to the previous school year. A greater proportion of grade 2 learners regressed in reading this year and we believe this reflects the lost time in school in Spring of 2019 where those learners (who would have been in grade 1) would typically “take off” in reading.  We look forward to reporting data on reading in Spring 2021 as we believe that students will make strong gains in reading having received continuous instruction this school year.   

 

2020 Fall PM Benchmark Data

 

No Data

Not Yet Meeting

Meeting

Exceeding

Total Number of Students

Gr 1

8%

19%

65%

8%

26

Gr 2

5%

59%

18%

18%

22

Gr 3

10%

33%

30%

27%

30

 

Comparison of 2020 Fall PM Benchmark to Previous Year’s Reading Levels

 

Regressed to a lower level

Maintained same level

Progressed to higher level

Number of students with available data

Grade 2

40% 

35%

25%

20 students

Grade 3

14%

55%

31 %

22 students

 

Previous Years' Data:

2019/20 PM Benchmark Data

 

No Data

Not Yet Meeting

Meeting

Exceeding

Total Number of Students

Gr 1

13%

3%

40%

43%

30

Gr 2

4%

21%

50%

25%

28

 

In Spring 2019, end of grade three RAD data shows 55% of learners meeting or exceeding expectations based on overall scores. 30% of these learners were minimally meeting expectations on this assessment. Spring 2020 RAD data is not available. To address what we believe is a written output area of concern we continue to focus on writing fluency/confidence throughout the school beginning in kindergarten. We will continue to look at Spring Rad scores which we believe is largely a measure of written output strengths and needs.

 

Spring 2020 Grade Three RAD Data - Not Available

 

Spring 2019 Grade Three RAD Data

 

Did not write

Not Yet Meeting

Minimally Meeting

Meeting

Exceeding

Gr 3

14%

2%

30%

50%

5%

 

 One tool used to support literacy skill development is ‘circle charts’. Circle charts are a tracking tool, from Janet Mort’s Joyful Literacy program, which pinpoints skill instruction and progress of foundational literacy skills for an individual student. We use circle charts in Kindergarten and in grade 1. We were not able to tabulate circle chart data for June 2020 but we look forward to sharing circle data for 2021 as we complete assessments.

Kindergarten data based on Circle Charts in June 2019

Know all letter names and sounds

Know 0 to 9 sight words

Know 10 to 19 sight words

Know 20 to 39 sight words

Know 40 or more sight words

87.5%

12%

16%

53%

19%

 

Grade 1 data based on Circle Charts in June 2019 from one class of 20

Know all letter names and sounds

Know 50 to 99 sight words

Know 100 to 149 sight words

Know 150 to 199 sight words

Know 200 or more sight words

Reading at PM 16 or higher

100%

10%

5%

35%

50%

85%

 

Fall 2020 DNA data for grade 3 learners (based on end of grade 2) showed 31% of learners meeting expectations on number sense questions. ‘Number sense’ refers to the ability to understand the value of a number and represent the number in different ways (using real-life examples, representing using math tiles, on a number line, etc). We know that strong number sense supports students’ achievement in all areas of math. In addition to other strategies to support numeracy, we continue to use SNAP Math tool as a formative and summative assessment tool to improve learners’ understanding of number sense. We will continue to look at Spring DNA assessment data as a measure of improvement in this area.

 

Fall 2020 DNA (Number Sense) Data for Grade Three (End of Grade 2)

 

Did Not Write

Not Yet Meeting

Approaching Expectations

Meeting Expectations

Gr 3

14%

24%

31%

31%

 

Spring 2020 DNA (Number Sense) Data for Grade Three - Not Available

 

Spring 2019 DNA (Number Sense) Data for Grade Three (End of Grade 3)

 

Did Not Write

Not Yet Meeting

Approaching Expectations

Meeting Expectations

Gr 3

5%

7%

5%

84%